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Your Breast A-Z Knowledge

 


About Breast
Anatomy
Breast Composition
Breast Development
Stages of Breast Development
Breast Size, Appearance and Change Over Time
Effect of Hormones
Growth Mechanism
Factors Effecting The Breast
Breast Sagging
Levels of Sagging
Shape of Breast
Breast Facts
Myths About Breast

Anatomy

The breast is a mound of glandular, fatty and fibrous tissue located over the pectoralis muscles of the chest wall and attached to these muscles by fibrous strands (Cooper's ligaments). The breast itself has no muscle tissue, which is why exercises will not build up the breasts. A layer of fat surrounds the breast glands and extends throughout the breast. This fatty tissue gives the breast a soft consistency and gentle, flowing contour. The actual breast is composed of fat, glands with the capacity for milk production when stimulated by special hormones, blood vessels, milk ducts to transfer the milk from the glands to the nipples and sensory nerves that give feeling to the breast. These nerves extend upward from the muscle layer through the breast and are highly sensitive, especially in the regions of the nipple and areola, which accounts for the sexual responsiveness of some women's breasts.

Because the breast is made up of tissues with different textures, it may not have a smooth surface and often feels lumpy. This irregularity is especially noticeable when a woman is thin and has little breast fat to soften the contours; it becomes less obvious after menopause, when the cyclic changes and endocrine stimulation of the breast have ceased and the glandular tissue softens. Estrogen supplements after menopause can cause continued lumpiness. The breast glands drain into a collecting system of ducts that go to the base of the nipple. The ducts then extend through the nipple and open on its outer surface. In addition to serving as a channel for milk, these ducts are often the source of breast problems

The ducts end in the nipple, (which projects from the surface of the breast), and are a conduit for the milk secreted by the glands and suckled by a baby during breast-feeding. There is considerable variation in women's nipples. In some, the nipple is constantly erect; in others, it only becomes erect when stimulated by cold, physical contact or sexual activity. Still other women have inverted nipples. Surrounding the nipple is a slightly raised circle of pigmented skin called the areola. The nipple and areola contain specialized muscle fibers that make the nipple erect and give the areola its firm texture. The areola also contains Montgomery's glands, which may appear as small, raised lumps on the surface of the areola. These glands lubricate the areola and are not symptoms of an abnormal condition. Beneath the breast is a large muscle, the pectoralis major, which assists in arm movement; the breast rests on this muscle. Originating on the chest wall, the pectoralis major extends from deep under the breast to attach to the upper arm. It also helps form the axillary fold, created where the arm and chest wall meet. The axilla (armpit) is the depression behind this fold. Each woman's breasts are shaped differently. Individual breast appearance is influenced by the volume of a woman's breast tissue and fat, her age, a history of previous pregnancies and lactation, her heredity, the quality and elasticity of her breast skin and the influence of hormones.


Breast consists of

Cooper's Ligament:
A strong ligamentous band extending upward and backward from the base of Gimbernat's ligament along the iliopectineal line to which it is attached -- called also ligament of Cooper.

Pectoralis major:

A larger chest muscle that arises from the clavicle, the sternum, the cartilages of most or all of the ribs, and the aponeurosis of the external oblique muscle and is inserted by a strong flat tendon into the posterior bicipital ridge of the humerus.

Pectoralis minor:
A smaller chest muscle that lies beneath the larger, arises from the third, fourth, and fifth ribs, and is inserted by a flat tendon into the coracoid process of the scapula.

Connective tissue:

A tissue of mesodermal origin rich in intercellular substance or interlacing processes with little tendency for the cells to come together in sheets or masses ; specifically : connective tissue of stellate or spindle-shaped cells with interlacing processes that pervades, supports, and binds together other tissues and forms ligaments and tendons.

Blood vessels:
Any of the vessels through which blood circulates in the body.Ribs: Any of the paired curved bony or partly cartilaginous rods that stiffen the lateral walls of the body of most vertebrates and protect the viscera, that occur in mammals exclusively or almost exclusively in the thoracic region, and that in humans normally include 12 pairs of which all are articulated with the spinal column at the dorsal end and the first 10 are connected also at the ventral end with the sternum by costal cartilages.

Subcutaneous fat:

fat cells being, living, used, or made under the skin.

Infra-mammary crease:
Infra- meaning below, mammary meaning breast. The fold or crease under the breast where the breast lobe meets the torso.

Breast fat:
Fatty tissue found above the glandular tissue of the breast. The breast is mostly made up of lobules, milk ducts, fat, and glandular tissue.Ducts: A bodily tube or vessel especially when carrying the secretion of a gland, specifically breast milk. esp. lactiferous ducts, milk ducts.

Glandular tissue:
Of relating to, or involving glands, gland cells, or their products; specifically breast milk production. esp. lobules.

Nipple:
The protuberance of a mammary gland upon which in the female the lactiferous ducts open and from which milk is drawn.

Lobules:
The glandular part of the breast where milk is produced.

Breast envelope:
The skin which surrounds the structure of the breast.

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Breast Composition

The breast is a mass of glandular, fatty, and fibrous tissues positioned over the pectoral muscles of the chest wall and attached to the chest wall by fibrous strands called Cooper’s ligaments. A layer of fatty tissue surrounds the breast glands and extends throughout the breast. The fatty tissue gives the breast a soft consistency.

The glandular tissues of the breast house the lobules (milk producing glands at the ends of the lobes) and the ducts (milk passages). Toward the nipple, each duct widens to form a sac (ampulla). During lactation, the bulbs on the ends of the lobules produce milk. Once milk is produced, it is transferred through the ducts to the nipple.

The breast is composed of:
 
  •  Milk glands (lobules) that produce milk
  •  
  •  Ducts that transport milk from the milk glands (lobules) to the nipple
  •  
  •  Nippl
  •  
  •  Connective (fibrous) tissue that surrounds the lobules and ducts
  •  
  •  Fat

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    Breast Development

    Though breast growth is not visible until puberty, breast development begins very early in the embryo and can be discerned within just a few weeks of conception. Interestingly, the earliest stages are identical in male and female fetuses, so many men could develop fully functioning breasts given the right hormonal conditions.

    After birth the breast has only two phases of development; the first at puberty with the outpouring of the hormones oestrogen and progesterone; the second during pregnancy and lactation, when the milk-producing lobules become larger.

    If puberty is stunted or if a woman remains childless, her breasts will not fully develop. The first stage of breast development begins in the embryo at about six weeks, with a thickening in the skin called the mammary ridge or milk line.

    By the time the fetus is six months old, this extends from the armpit to the groin, but it soon dies back, leaving two breast buds on the upper half oft he chest. Occasionally, rudimentary mammary glands develop along the milk line forming additional nipples or breasts that sometimes persist into adult life. More rarely, the two breast buds fade away with the rest of the milk line, so that the nipples are absent from birth.

    Because the initial development of the milk line is the same in male and female fetuses, this development can appear in the male and the female.

    When a female fetus is about six months old, 15 - 20 solid columns of cells grow inward from each breast bud. Each column becomes a separate "sweat" or exocrine gland. With it’s own separate duct leading to the nipple.

    By the eighth month of fetal development, these columns of cells have become hollow so that, by birth, a nipple and a rudimentary milk-duct system have formed. No further development takes place until puberty.

    The first external signs of breast development appear at the age of 10 or 11 - though it can be as late as 14 years. The ovaries start to secrete estrogen leading to an accumulation of fat in the connective tissue that causes the breast to enlarge. The duct system also begins to develop, but only to the point of forming cellular knobs at the end of the ducts.

    As far as we know the mechanism that secretes milk doesn’t develop until pregnancy. Although the breast may appear fully grown within a few years of puberty, strictly speaking, their development is not complete until they have fulfilled their biological function - that is, until the woman carries a pregnancy to term and breast-feeds her baby, when they will undergo further changes.


    Maturity of the breast


    Once a young woman reaches puberty, and ovulation and the menstrual cycle begins, the breasts start to mature, forming real secretory glands at the ends of the milk ducts. Initially these glands are very primitive and may consist of only one or two layers of cells surrounded by a base membrane.

    Between this membrane and the glandular cells are cells of another type, called myo-epithelial cells, these cells are the ones that contract and squeeze milk from the gland if pregnancy occurs and milk production takes place .

    With further growth, the lobes of the glands become separated from one another by dense connective tissue and fat deposits. This tissue is easily stretched. This is where the natural enlargement formula comes in and allows the enlargement that normally occurs during pregnancy when the glandular elements swell and grow

    The duct system grows considerably after conception and many more glands and lobules are formed. This causes the breast to increase in size as it matures to fulfill its role of providing food for the baby.


    FEMALE CHANGES


    Most women notice that just before menstruation their breasts enlarge and their nipples become sensitive and even painful. The texture of the breasts change and they become rather lumpy, with small discrete swellings that resemble orange pips in both texture and size. These lumps are glands in the breast which enlarge in preparation for pregnancy.

    If pregnancy doesn’t occur, breasts return to their normal size and the glands become imperceptible to touch within a few days, ready for re-growth the next month. These changes in the breast are only one part of many changes that occur in the female body as the result of the monthly ebb and flow of the female hormones estrogen and progesterone . AGING OF THE BREASTS.

    As we get older, our breasts tend to sag and flatten; the larger the breasts, the more they sag. With the menopause there is a reduction in stimulation by the hormone oestrogen to all tissues of the body, including breast tissue; this results in a reduction in the glandular tissue of the breasts. So they loose their earlier fullness.

    Regular exercise would have however prevented or slowed down the ageing process. Much of the connective tissue in the breast is composed of a fibrous protein called collagen, which needs oestrogen to keep it healthy. Without oestrogen, it becomes dehydrated and inelastic. Once the collagen has lost its shape and stretchability it "was" believed that it could not return to its former state or condition.

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    Stages of Breast Development

    Human breast tissue begins to develop in the sixth week of fetal life. Breast tissue initially develops along the lines of the armpits and extends to the groin (this is called the milk ridge). By the ninth week of fetal life, it regresses (goes back) to the chest area, leaving two breast buds on the upper half of the chest. In females, columns of cells grow inward from each breast bud, becoming separate sweat glands with ducts leading to the nipple. Both male and female infants have very small breasts and actually experience some nipple discharge during the first few days after birth.

    Female breasts do not begin growing until puberty—the period in life when the body undergoes a variety of changes to prepare for reproduction. Puberty usually begins for women around age 10 or 11. After pubic hair begins to grow, the breasts will begin responding to hormonal changes in the body. Specifically, the production of two hormones, estrogen and progesterone, signal the development of the glandular breast tissue.. During this time, fat and fibrous breast tissue becomes more elastic. The breast ducts begin to grow and this growth continues until menstruation begins (typically one to two years after breast development has begun). Menstruation prepares the breasts and ovaries for potential pregnancy.

    Before puberty
    Early puberty
    Late puberty
    The breast is flat except for the nipple that sticks out from the chest The areola becomes a prominent bud; breasts begin to fill out Glandular tissue and fat increase in the breast, and areola becomes flat

    Female Breast Developmental Stages
    Stage 1
    (Preadolescent) only the tip of the nipple is raised.
    Stage 2
    Buds appear, breast and nipple raised, and the areola (dark area of  skin that surrounds the nipple) enlarges.
    Stage 3
    Breasts are slightly larger with glandular breast tissue present.
    Stage 4
    The areola and nipple become raised
    and form a second mound above the rest of the breast
    Stage 5
    Mature adult breast; the breast becomes
    rounded and only the nipple is raised.

    Five Stages of Brast Development

    Breasts during childhood. The breasts are flat and show no signs of development.
    Breast bud stage. Milk ducts and fat tissue form a small mound.
    Breast continue to grow. Breast become rounder and fuller.
    Nipple and areola form separate small mound. Not all girls go through this stage. Some skip stage 4 and go directly to stage 5.
    Breast growth enters finial stage.
    Adult breast is full and round shaped.

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    Breast Size, Appearance and Change Over Time

    The size and shape of women’s breasts varies considerably. Some women have a large amount of breast tissue, and therefore, have large breasts. Other women have a smaller amount of tissue with little breast fat.

    Factors that may influence a woman’s breast size include:
     
  •  Volume of breast tissue
  •  
  •  Family history
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  •  Age
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  •  Weight loss or gain
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  •  History of pregnancies and lactation
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  •  Thickness and elasticity of the breast skin
  •  
  •  Degree of hormonal influences on the breast (particularly estrogen and     progesterone)
  •  
  •  Menopause

  • A woman’s breasts are rarely balanced (symmetrical). Usually, one breast is slightly larger or smaller, higher or lower, or shaped differently than the other. The size and characteristics of the nipple also vary greater from one woman to another. In some women, the nipples are constantly erect. In others, they will only become erect when stimulated by cold or touch. Some women also have inverted (turned in) nipples. Inverted nipples are not a cause for concern unless the condition is a new change. Since there are hair follicles around the nipple, hair on the breast is not uncommon.

    The nipple can be flat, round, or cylindrical in shape. The color of the nipple is determined by the thinness and pigmentation of its skin. The nipple and areola (pigmented region surrounding the nipple) contain specialized muscle fibers that respond to stimulation to make the nipple erect. The areola also houses the Montgomery’s gland that may appear as tiny, raised bumps on the surface of the areola. The Montgomery’s gland helps lubricate the areola. When the nipple is stimulated, the muscle fibers will contract, the areola will pucker, and the nipples become hard.

    Breast shape and appearance undergo a number of changes as a woman ages. In young women, the breast skin stretches and expands as the breasts grow, creating a rounded appearance. Young women tend to have denser breasts (more glandular tissue) than older women.

    During each menstrual cycle, breast tissue tends to swell from changes in the body’s levels of estrogen and progesterone. The milk glands and ducts enlarge, and in turn, the breasts retain water. During menstruation, breasts may temporarily feel swollen, painful, tender, or lumpy.

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    The Effect Of Hormones Breast Tissue

    The breast is responsive to a complex interplay of hormones that cause the breast tissue to develop, enlarge and produce milk. The three major hormones affecting the breast are estrogen, progesterone and prolactin, which cause glandular tissue in both the breast and uterus to change during a woman's menstrual cycle. Because of reduced hormonal levels, the breasts are less full for 1 to 2 weeks after menstrual flow; therefore, it may be easier to detect breast lumps during this time. Reduction of hormonal levels is also responsible for the breast's return to its pre-pregnant state after breast-feeding is concluded.

    Breast shape and appearance change as a woman ages. In the young woman the breast skin is stretched and expanded by the developing breasts. The breast in the adolescent is usually hemispherical, rounded and equally full in all areas. As a woman gets older, the topside of the breast tissue settles to a lower position, the skin stretches and the shape of the breast changes. After menopause, with the decrease of hormonal activity, the composition of the breast changes; the amount of glandular tissue decreases and fat and ductal tissue become the predominant components of the breast. Reduction in glandular volume can result in further looseness of the breast skin.

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    Breast Enhancement : Growth Mechanism

    Before one can fully understand how a breast enhancement or breast enlargement product works, one must have a limited amount of knowledge of what causes a female body to develop breasts in the first place.

    Scientific research has concluded that breast tissue growth occurs as a result of the effects of estrogen, progesterone, prolacin, prostaglandins, and human growth hormone. It is important that all of these hormones be present in the body in the proper balance for normal breast tissue development.

    During childhood, estrogens are secreted in small quantities. Following puberty however, the quantity of estrogens secreted under the influence of the pituitary hormones (FHS, LH) increases some 20 fold or more.
    At this time sexual organs change from those of a child to that of an adult. The external genitalia enlarge. Estrogens effect on the breast causes fat deposition, development of the stromal tissues of the breast and growth of an extensive ductile system. Along with estrogen, progesterone and prolactin are secreted in higher quantities from the ovaries after puberty.
    These two hormones are responsible for growth of the lobules and alveoli of the breast determining growth and function of these structures.

    Progesterone promotes development of the lobules and alveoli of the breasts causing the alveolar cells to proliferate to enlarge and to become secretory in nature. However, progesterone does not cause the alveoli to secrete milk.

    Unless stimulated by prolactin from the pituitary. Progesterone cause the breasts to swell partially due to changes in the lobules and alveoli, but also partly from increased fluid retention in sub-cutaneous tissues.

    Before one can fully understand how a breast enhancement or breast enlargement product works, one must have a limited amount of knowledge of what causes a female body to develop breasts in the first place.

    Scientific research has concluded that breast tissue growth occurs as a result of the effects of estrogen, progesterone, prolacin, prostaglandins, and human growth hormone. It is important that all of these hormones be present in the body in the proper balance for normal breast tissue development.

    During childhood, estrogens are secreted in small quantities. Following puberty however, the quantity of estrogens secreted under the influence of the pituitary hormones (FHS, LH) increases some 20 fold or more.

    At this time sexual organs change from those of a child to that of an adult. The external genitalia enlarge. Estrogens effect on the breast causes fat deposition, development of the stromal tissues of the breast and growth of an extensive ductile system. Along with estrogen, progesterone and prolactin are secreted in higher quantities from the ovaries after puberty. These two hormones are responsible for growth of the lobules and alveoli of the breast determining growth and function of these structures.

    Progesterone promotes development of the lobules and alveoli of the breasts causing the alveolar cells to proliferate to enlarge and to become secretory in nature. However, progesterone does not cause the alveoli to secrete milk

    Unless stimulated by prolactin from the pituitary. Progesterone cause the breasts to swell partially due to changes in the lobules and alveoli, but also partly from increased fluid retention in sub-cutaneous tissues.

    Scientists have proven that stimulating the estrogen receptors in the breast with estrogen or estrogen like substance (phytoestrogens) can actually increase the size of the female breast as much as 150%.


    SUMMERY

    The estrogen initiate growth of the breast and are responsible for the characteristic external appearance of the mature female breast.

    In females where the ovaries don't produce sufficient amounts of estrogen and progesterone under developed breasts may occur. As females age, the ovaries slowly begin to produce less hormones, resulting in sagging smaller breasts. Scientific evidence shows that additional estrogen and progesterone may enhance breast growth.

    Phytohormones are estrogen like compound. Phyto-estrogens can share some of the same biological activities with oestrogens produced in the body. Although Phyto-estrogens are much weaker than the body’s own naturally occurring (or endogenous) estrogens, estrogen-like effects are apparent after the consumption of Phyto-estrogens in many, if not all, of the oestrogen-receptive tissues in the body.

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    Factors Effecting The Breast

    Although the breasts of non-pregnant women are generally considered inactive, they undergo cyclic changes associated with normal ovulation. Many women experience a premenstrual increase in breast size and density. Many women also feel breast tenderness in relation to these changes. This slight engorgement is probably due to tissue edema (holding water in the tissue). Older women who have fibrotic lumps may experience an increase in pain, usually along the perimeter of the breast mass. The volume and density changes are thought to be resultant of the changing levels of estrogens and progesterone during the menstrual cycle.

    Hormone therapy, such as birth contraceptives, can also influence breast density. A constant inrush of estrogens and progestins can simulate premenstrual breast changes, often making the breasts tender. During menopause the changes in gonadotropins, estrogens and progesterone induce changes in both glandular and ductal components. Without hormone replacement therapy, the number and size of the glandular elements decrease and the volume of the breast becomes smaller. Likewise, there is a loss of contour due to the decrease in structure.

    During pregnancy, the numerous changes in the breast induce gradual increases in weight and size as it produces and stores milk. The lactating breast is continually changing density, and the sensitive nipple is extremely vulnerable to chaffing by fabric rubbing. Therefore, pregnant and lactating women are highly encouraged to wear appropriate supportive bras while participating in physical activities.

    As we have seen, the lack of internal anatomical support of the breast structures requires some type of external support. Excessive movement of the breasts during physical exercise may increase this need for some women because of the structural changes during pregnancy and menstruation.

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    Breast Sagging (PTOSIS)

    Most women’s breasts lose their perk with age and extremely large-breasted women will be affected earlier and to a certain degree. But the reasons aren’t related to ligaments or even strictly dependent on breast size. Much more important are inherited characteristics such as skin elasticity and breast density which reflects the ratio of lightweight fat to heavier glands.

    There is the tendency for older women to show sagging of the breasts. The sagging is caused by partial deterioration of the glandular tissues that produce firmness of the breasts and some stretching of the tissues connecting the breasts to their muscles. Measures may be taken earlier in life that may prevent, or at least reduce, sagging later in life. They include wearing supportive brassieres during pregnancy, breast feeding, and exercising.

    Breast sagging occurs for several different reasons - multiple pregnancies, breast feeding, rapid weight loss, genetics, gravity and age.

    Just as all body tissues are susceptible to the effects of gravity over time, the breast, because it is an external organ and not protected from external forces, also undergoes changes over time. The connective tissues supporting the breast are always under constant stretch due to the effects of gravity on the weight of the breast, this effect eventually causes the relaxation of these supporting ligaments creating the sagging effect. Breast feeding is another contributor to breast sagging because of the expansion and contraction of the breast tissue over months of breast feeding eventually results in drooping breast changes in susceptible women. Other women may be prone to ptosis because of changes in weight, genetics or multiple pregnancies.


    Another reason for breasts sagging is the lack of the hormone estrogen, which occurs at menopause. This reduction in estrogen affects all the tissues of the body, including breast tissue, and results in a reduction in size and fullness. The milk secretion process is also halted by this time. Much of the connective tissue in the breast is composed of a fibrous protein called collagen, which needs estrogen to keep it healthy. Without estrogen, it becomes dehydrated and loses it's elasticity.



    Both during pregnancy and as you reach menopause - make breasts sag even more. During pregnancy, the hormones estrogen and progesterone, which are secreted by the ovaries and the placenta, stimulate development of the 15 to 20 lobes of milk-secreting glands embedded in the breast's fatty tissue. These changes are permanent. And although the glands may be empty after they're no longer needed to produce milk, they will still add bulk and firmness to the breast. Once menopause arrives, however, the drop in estrogen and progesterone signal the breast that its milk ducts and lobes can retire. As a result, the breasts shrinks, add fat and begins to sag over and above the demands of gravity. Fortunately there are three ways to prevent, and sometimes reverse, both saggy and stretch marks breasts.

    Premature sagging occurs as a result of stretching the Cooper's ligaments that help suspend and support the breast. Breast ptosis can result from a loosening of the skin and suspensory ligaments. Gravity and weight of breasts take their toll over time. Ptosis can also come from a reduction in the volume of breast tissue. This can occur after pregnancy and weight loss.

    One of the reasons for sagging breasts is age! As we age, our skin ages too. It does not hold things up as well as it did when we were young, becasue it has lost some of its elasticity. The older we get the less elastic our skin becomes. Thats why so many older women have sagging breasts.

    breast sagging
    If you are a young woman with breasts that are sagging, it may be for several other reasons. If you are not getting enough support from your bra or not wearing a bra at all, your breasts can start to sag due to lack of support. This is especially true for larger breasted women, and women who may be participating in sports without the proper sports bra. The third reason for the onset of sagging breasts in some younger women is change in overall breast size after having a baby. A woman's breasts generally become larger and engorged with milk in preparation for breastfeeding. Once breastfeeding is over, her breasts may not snap back.

    As we age, after pregnancy (or exposure to breast growth due to hormones) or weight gain then loss, we experience atrophy of the breast tissue and it's envelope. From pregnancy or hormone-induced gain then loss -- this loss is called involution. From weight gain, then loss -- this is from the body losing the filling and fat which it had prior to the weight loss. Aging is merciless and we start losing collagen and elastin and the breast envelope begins to thin, weaken and eventually - becomes ptotic (saggy).

    After our breasts enlarge due to pregnancy they usually shrink postpartumly. Other changes result from having breastfed, estrogen and progesterone supplementation in the form or shots, implants or medications, hormonal disorders, menopause and lastly age. As we age our skin thins, we lose breast volume due to the shrinking of our lobules due to a decrease in hormones. We also lose body fat in areas where we want it, and seem to somehow selectively gain it where we do not.

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    Different Levels Of Sagging

    There are certainly varying degrees of ptosis which only need certain smaller lifts for correction and other cases which need a full lifting. Following are the most commonly described ptotic grades to help you better determine what you may need.

    HOW TO TELL YOUR DEGREE OF PTOSIS

    Determine your mammary crease as it is directly underneath the breasts. These two levels may be higher than one another. You can use a ruler if you wish it. The highest part of the ruler should be directly against the junction of the breast and ribcage.

    breast sagging
    Mild Ptosis

    If the central point of your nipple (not your areola) is slightly above or directly in front of the top of this ruler (your breast crease) - you may have Grade 1 ptosis. Very mild to mild ptosis usually needs only a crescent lift.
    breast sagging
    Mild to Moderate

    If the central point of your nipple (not your areola) is 1 - 3 cm below the top of this ruler (your breast crease) you may have Grade 2 ptosis i.e. Mild to Moderate Ptosis .
    breast sagging
    Savere Ptosis

    If the central point of your nipple (including your areola) is more than 3 cm below the top of this ruler (your breast crease) you may have Grade 3 ptosis i.e. Severe Ptosis.
    breast sagging
    Pseudo - ptosis

    Psuedo-ptosis is when your nipple is still slightly or well above your inframammary crease but it still appears droopy due to the presence of a significant, but somewhat flattened, breast lobe. Usually persons with pseudo-ptosis have smaller areola complexes which did not stretch during the pregnancy or weight gain.
    breast sagging
    Mild Ptosis, Asymmmetry

    Even though you pass the "tests" above you may still feel as though your breasts are too low on your chest wall or that your areolae have stretched out.
    breast sagging
    Low Breast

    Like said above, some women's breasts actually sit on the chest wall lower. They have no ptosis, have good volume and a proper infra-mammary crease, BUT - the entire breast complex is rather low on the torso.

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    Shape of Breast

    breast sagging This is the perfect breast shape.
    breast sagging The "swooping" breast is actually pretty common. Some maybe be due to lack of volume but no sag - it is actually among the better of the shapes to have if you're going to get implants. The nipples point upwards which is major asset in breast augmentation surgery. Of course breast shape can be hereditary.
    breast sagging The ptotic, (saggy) breast with some volume is also very common. Usually after a pregnancy you will lose volume, have enlarged areolae and thinned skin due to stretching during the pregnancy. Breast feeding can affect the nipple structure as well - causing it to elongate.
    breast sagging The ptotic, (saggy) breast with little to no volume is very common after pregnancy, breastfeeding, weight loss and aging - or all four combined. Although many young mothers may experience this after pregnancy and breast feeding, where aging is not a factor. However it is truly dependent upon the individual.
    breast sagging The ptotic, (saggy) breast with much volume will more than likely need a lift.
    breast sagging This case is more common than you think.
    breast sagging This is more of a breast anomaly than a shape. Often called "Tubular breasts" or "constricted breasts".
    breast sagging This shape is usually due to herniation of the tissue, lobules and fat without proper containment by the connective tissue under the areolae complex.
    breast sagging Pectus carinatum congenital chest deformity (pigeon chest) with ptosis: This isn't exactly a breast shape, per se, but rather a "deformity" or divergence of the chest. The ribs usually protrude as can the sternum. Sometimes the ribs stick out much further than the sternum causing lack of self esteem or self consciousness of the breasts.


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    Breast Facts

    1) Breasts can start growing as early as age 10 and don't stop until your early 20's.
    2) Breasts have been overly sexualized in Western culture making them too big a part of a girls physical identity.
    3) Breasts have a biological purpose - for feeding babies.
    4) Having a baby changes ones breasts forever, and many women get larger (but much less perky) breasts after pregnancy.
    5) During puberty breasts can develop rapidly causing discomfort, sensitivity and even stretch mark.
    6) Larger breasts do not make a girl more feminine, sexier or "better".
    7) Very large breasts can cause back pain and poor posture.
    8) Brast are more than just underwear, they are necessary to keep your breasts supported and to stop injury to the breast tissue while playing sports.
    9) Breast cancer is rare in teen aged girls but it is important to get used to checking your breasts for lumps and irregularities as soon as you start having your period - this is especially important if you have a family history of breast cancer.
    10) All breasts, no matter what size and no matter what guys may say, are beautiful and amazing to the opposite sex.

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    Myths About Breast

    1) Breasts can start growing as early as age 10 and don't stop until your early 20's.
    2) Breasts have been overly sexualized in Western culture making them too big a part of a girls physical identity.
    3) Breasts have a biological purpose - for feeding babies.
    4) Having a baby changes ones breasts forever, and many women get larger (but much less perky) breasts after pregnancy.

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